Stanford Medicine 25 Blog

Erb and Westphal

by Damiana Andonova Wilhelm Heinrich Erb of Bavaria, an internist interested in neurology, was a professor in Heidelberg, Germany. He is most known for writing about the importance of deep tendon reflexes to the neurological exam in the January 1875 issue of Archiv fur Psychiatrie und Nervenkrankheiten. Carl Friedrich Otto Westphal was a professor in Berlin and an

Clinical Medicine Article by Dr. Andy Elder

A member of our Stanford 25 team, Dr. Andy Elder, recently published his thoughts about his visiting professorship to Stanford last year. Dr. Elder is now the Medical Director of the MRCP(UK) examination​, one part of which is the PACES​ bedside skills examination – ​which, with ​5,000 candidates sitting per year in ​fifteen​ countries around

The Birth of Percussion

It should come to no surprise to us that the invention of percussion came from the mind of a musician. Leopold Auenbrugger was a physician, but he was also a composer who wrote an opera for an Austrian empress. However the coming together of music and medicine had its origins in watching his father tap on the side of

The Internet: The Elephant in the Examination Room

Damiana Andonova Peter Conrad, a sociologist at Brandeis University, spoke of the rise and fall of the medical authority in the doctor patient office encounter in his many scholarly articles. With the internet becoming the “elephant in the doctor’s office,” the dynamic of medical authority has certainly changed. As the internet evolves into a virtual space for

Abraham Verghese Interviews with Medscape’s Eric Topol

The leader of our Stanford 25 program, Abraham Verghese, recently sat down with Medscape’s Editor-In-Chief, Eric Topol. This interview was part a number of popular videos for a Medscape’s One-On-One series that is newly published today. In the video, Dr. Verghese discusses his early years, upcoming book and talks about his career path to becoming

Stanford 25 Website Passes One Million Visitors!

The purpose of the Stanford 25 is more than teaching the physical exam. The original calling that brought us all to medicine, and to the care of the sick resides to such a large degree in connecting with the patient, and in the interaction at the bedside. It is both important to the patient, and

Interview with Dr. Eric Topol (editor-in-chief of Medscape)

The editor-in-chief of Medscape, Dr. Eric Topol, visited Stanford to sit down and do an interview with our Dr. Vergese for the Medscape One-on-One online video series. During this visit I got to meet with him to ask him a few questions. Dr. Topal is a cardiologist, geneticist and researcher. He has also been a

Do You Know How to Measure an Ankle Brachial Index?

The ankle brachial index (ABI) is a common and useful exam in the outpatient setting to detect peripheral arterial disease. ABI’s should be measured in all people over the age of 50 if they are a diabetic or a smoker. It should also be checked in patients over the age of 60. While many doctors

The History of Bedside Ultrasound: From Submarines to Sub-Interns

By Michael Vogel Among the myriad of modern diagnostic tools, few can claim the certainty, consistency, and intimacy of ultrasound. In contrast to other dominant types of medical imaging characterized by large, foreign machines and uncomfortable noise and positioning, this sound-based imaging technique is one of the least intimidating and widely-used exam method, applied in

The Babinski Sign

By Michael Vogel Among the key players in the neurological revolution of the early 19th Century, few may claim as much lasting relevance as Jean-Martin Charcot. Lending his eponym to phenomena such as Charcot’s Joint (diabetic arthropathy), Charcot’s Triad (acute cholangitis) and most notably Charcot’s Disease (ALS), the French physician is widely considered to be