Stanford Medicine 25 Blog

Slow Medicine Versus Fast Medicine

As we watch medicine unfold, there is a lovely debate emerging around slow versus fast medicine. It would seem that emphasis on the bedside falls very much in the category of the former. This debate also is reminiscent of the work of David Orr and his lovely books, THE NATURE OF DESIGN and DESIGN ON

The Flipped Patient

Many of us in the Program in Bedside Medicine are deeply involved in the medical students pre-clerkship curriculum. Each week the students interview hospitalized patients, perform physical exams, give presentations, followed by a written H&P note. These students enter the patient room with only pen and paper, as they have not yet gained access to

Tripe Palms

A patient’s hands may reveal much about them. Fingers, nails and palms can all tell their own stories of habits, occupations or disease. The right hand of a 71-year-old female is shown below. Deep tar staining of the thumb and pulps of the index and second finger are visible – a consequence of many years manipulating cigarettes

An Image For the Day

Kahlo’s Self-Portrait with Portrait of Dr. Farill (1951). This interesting image raises all sorts of questions. What was Frida trying to say? Was it a comment about presence or about lack thereof? Was it a way of sanctifying the doctor? We know he operated on her many times and she thought he had saved her life. What does

10 Osler-isms to Remember in Your Daily Practice

William Osler’s life and work remains so instructive. Here at Stanford we invoke his name often, and have something we call an “Osler Evening” to honor him; these are evenings where we interview a faculty member on stage, getting to know a bit about their life, the journey they made to get where they are. Here are some

Erb and Westphal

by Damiana Andonova Wilhelm Heinrich Erb of Bavaria, an internist interested in neurology, was a professor in Heidelberg, Germany. He is most known for writing about the importance of deep tendon reflexes to the neurological exam in the January 1875 issue of Archiv fur Psychiatrie und Nervenkrankheiten. Carl Friedrich Otto Westphal was a professor in Berlin and an

Clinical Medicine Article by Dr. Andy Elder

A member of our Stanford 25 team, Dr. Andy Elder, recently published his thoughts about his visiting professorship to Stanford last year. Dr. Elder is now the Medical Director of the MRCP(UK) examination​, one part of which is the PACES​ bedside skills examination – ​which, with ​5,000 candidates sitting per year in ​fifteen​ countries around

The Birth of Percussion

It should come to no surprise to us that the invention of percussion came from the mind of a musician. Leopold Auenbrugger was a physician, but he was also a composer who wrote an opera for an Austrian empress. However the coming together of music and medicine had its origins in watching his father tap on the side of

The Internet: The Elephant in the Examination Room

Damiana Andonova Peter Conrad, a sociologist at Brandeis University, spoke of the rise and fall of the medical authority in the doctor patient office encounter in his many scholarly articles. With the internet becoming the “elephant in the doctor’s office,” the dynamic of medical authority has certainly changed. As the internet evolves into a virtual space for

Abraham Verghese Interviews with Medscape’s Eric Topol

The leader of our Stanford 25 program, Abraham Verghese, recently sat down with Medscape’s Editor-In-Chief, Eric Topol. This interview was part a number of popular videos for a Medscape’s One-On-One series that is newly published today. In the video, Dr. Verghese discusses his early years, upcoming book and talks about his career path to becoming