Stanford Medicine 25 Blog

What’s the Mass in the Neck?

A 21 year old Japanese male is presenting with a mass in his neck he finds incidentally. The mass is best seen on the right side of his neck when he turns his head to the left. The picture denotes a change upon swallowing. What is his diagnosis and workup? (Scroll down to see answer)

Can you Diagnose this Common Rash in Young Adults?

A 31 year old male with no significant past medical history presents with a new rash over both his legs, arms and trunk. The rash (shown in the picture below) is described as multiple small scaly areas, and is only mildly itchy. Your patient states to have recovered from a “cold” about one month ago.

The Jugular Venous Pulse – Circa 1957

In 1902 Sir James Mackenzie published a book entitled “The Study of the Pulse. Arterial, venous, and hepatic and of the movements of the heart” that described his studies on the jugular pulse using what would later and famously be known as the “Mackenzie polygraph”. He was the first to make recordings of the arterial

Announcing the Stanford 25 Skills Symposium

Calling all physician educators! Join John Kugler and Abraham Verghese and our core Stanford 25 team with guest faculty Dr. Steve McGee and Dr. Andrew Elder as we provide a 2-day course for physicians who teach or are interested in teaching at the bedside. Attendees will return to their institutions more confident at the bedside

Slow Medicine Versus Fast Medicine

As we watch medicine unfold, there is a lovely debate emerging around slow versus fast medicine. It would seem that emphasis on the bedside falls very much in the category of the former. This debate also is reminiscent of the work of David Orr and his lovely books, THE NATURE OF DESIGN and DESIGN ON

The Flipped Patient

Many of us in the Program in Bedside Medicine are deeply involved in the medical students pre-clerkship curriculum. Each week the students interview hospitalized patients, perform physical exams, give presentations, followed by a written H&P note. These students enter the patient room with only pen and paper, as they have not yet gained access to

Tripe Palms

A patient’s hands may reveal much about them. Fingers, nails and palms can all tell their own stories of habits, occupations or disease. The right hand of a 71-year-old female is shown below. Deep tar staining of the thumb and pulps of the index and second finger are visible – a consequence of many years manipulating cigarettes

An Image For the Day

Kahlo’s Self-Portrait with Portrait of Dr. Farill (1951). This interesting image raises all sorts of questions. What was Frida trying to say? Was it a comment about presence or about lack thereof? Was it a way of sanctifying the doctor? We know he operated on her many times and she thought he had saved her life. What does

10 Osler-isms to Remember in Your Daily Practice

William Osler’s life and work remains so instructive. Here at Stanford we invoke his name often, and have something we call an “Osler Evening” to honor him; these are evenings where we interview a faculty member on stage, getting to know a bit about their life, the journey they made to get where they are. Here are some

Erb and Westphal

by Damiana Andonova Wilhelm Heinrich Erb of Bavaria, an internist interested in neurology, was a professor in Heidelberg, Germany. He is most known for writing about the importance of deep tendon reflexes to the neurological exam in the January 1875 issue of Archiv fur Psychiatrie und Nervenkrankheiten. Carl Friedrich Otto Westphal was a professor in Berlin and an