Diagnose the cause of sepsis from one cell in the blood…

Diagnose the cause of sepsis from one cell in the blood…

Okay so we’re usually focusing on the physical exam but in this case, we’re demonstrating how taking the time to look at a patient’s blood under a microscope can help you diagnose and treat a sick patient. In the end, it’s all about good care for your patient right? The case: A 45 year old woman

A patient can’t swallow. These nails tell you why.

A patient can’t swallow. These nails tell you why.

A middle aged woman presents with difficulty swallowing. She has a history of  menometrorrhagia for 10 years, secondary to uterine fibroids. She endorses fatigue and shortness of breath. What’s the cause of her dysphagia and why? Answer: Esophageal webs in the setting of iron deficiency anemia. This is seen in Plummer-Vinson syndrome. This syndrome usually has: dysphagia

Name this abdominal mass?

Name this abdominal mass?

A 78 year woman presents with weight loss, lethargy and abdominal pain. Clinical examination showed abdominal distention and a firm, non-tender, irregular 1 cm nodule within the umbilicus.   What is this finding called? Sister Mary Joseph nodule (also called Sister Mary Joseph node or sign)   What does is represent? This is a palpable nodule

Dr. Rosenberg Teaches the Lymph Node & Spleen Exam

Dr. Saul Rosenberg was first recruited to Stanford in 1961 and was involved in the creation of our hospital’s first lymphoma program. Today, Dr. Rosenberg shared his years of experience to lead our Stanford Medicine 25 session on the lymph node and spleen exam. Take Home Point’s from Dr. Rosenberg: * Benign lymph nodes are

Lymph Node and Spleen Exam with Dr. Beth Martin

Dr. Beth Martin led this week’s Stanford 25 session by teaching our residents how she exams for enlarged lymph nodes and an enlarged spleen. Thank you to our wonderful Stanford/Palo Alto VA hematologist/oncologist, Dr. Martin! We asked Dr. Martin for a few tips on the lymph node exam. Here’s what she said: “Gowning is essential