Archives for March 2016

Fevers, mild confusion and this retinal finding… Diagnosis?

Fevers, mild confusion and this retinal finding… Diagnosis?

A 42 year old female presents to Stanford hospital with fevers, chills and mild confusion. You perform a fundoscopic examination and see this (image below). What is the diagnosis?     Answer: Roth spot What is a Roth Spot? A Roth spot, seen most commonly in acute bacterial endocarditis is a red spot (caused by hemorrhage)

Stanford 25 Skills Symposium 2016 Announced!

Stanford 25 Skills Symposium 2016 Announced!

The Program for Bedside Medicine at Stanford is proud to announce registration is open for the Stanford 25 Skills Symposium 2016! Date: August 27th and 28th 2016 (Saturday & Sunday) Location: Stanford University School of Medicine Visit this link for registration. You can also learn more about last year’s symposium and our upcoming event here. The Symposium is designed for early

Every Patient Has a Story Worth Hearing

Every Patient Has a Story Worth Hearing

Earlier this year, Canadian newspaper The Globe and Mail commemorated the anniversary of the death of neurologist Oliver Sacks by taking a look at his legacy. The piece, by author Norman Doidge, aptly reminds us that “the world’s most famous neurologist believed that every patient had a story worth hearing.” And indeed, his work proves

Diagnose the cause of sepsis from one cell in the blood…

Diagnose the cause of sepsis from one cell in the blood…

Okay so we’re usually focusing on the physical exam but in this case, we’re demonstrating how taking the time to look at a patient’s blood under a microscope can help you diagnose and treat a sick patient. In the end, it’s all about good care for your patient right? The case: A 45 year old woman

What will bedside manner look like for new data-driven physicians?

What will bedside manner look like for new data-driven physicians?

Earlier this year, Managed Care magazine published a cover story on young doctors. Praising them for their ability to collaborate, their openness to measurement and consciousness related to cost-effective care, the article advanced the idea that these “newly minted” physicians are just what health care needs. However, it had one main question: “How well will

A patient can’t swallow. These nails tell you why.

A patient can’t swallow. These nails tell you why.

A middle aged woman presents with difficulty swallowing. She has a history of  menometrorrhagia for 10 years, secondary to uterine fibroids. She endorses fatigue and shortness of breath. What’s the cause of her dysphagia and why? Answer: Esophageal webs in the setting of iron deficiency anemia. This is seen in Plummer-Vinson syndrome. This syndrome usually has: dysphagia